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Anglo-Boer War Museum

In modern society suffering caused by war is still a reality of international importance. South Africa experienced this suffering during the Anglo-Boer War, also referred to as the South African War of 1899-1902. The War Museum not only provides the visitor with an insight into the course and development of the war through its unique collection and exhibitions, but it also brings the visitor closer to understanding the background against which the war took place and the universal suffering it caused. The War Museum is an Agency of the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture with a collection of approximately 40 000 items of historic and cultural heritage value that are directly or indirectly related to the Anglo-Boer / South African War of 1899-1902. The War Museum is an institution of excellence whereby the inclusivity and suffering of all communities during the Anglo-Boer / South African War are depicted, thus propagating the message that negotiation is preferable to war.

MODEL INFORMATION

British chocolate tin

The Anglo-Boer War / South African War was fought on South African soil from 11 October 1899 – 31 May 1902. It was the last imperial war that Great Britain fought under Queen Victoria’s rule. Queen Victoria sent tins like this one, containing six small chocolate bars, to the soldiers in South Africa as a Christmas gift.

Heliograph

During the Anglo-Boer / South African War, communication was often wireless. The British Army as well as the Orange Free State Artillery and the Transvaal State Artillery used signal flags and heliographs to communicate. The word ‘heliograph’ is derived from the Greek ‘helios’ (sun) and ‘graphos’ (writing).

Model cart and horses

During the Anglo-Boer / South African War, British forces captured thousands of Boer prisoners of war (POWs). POWs were sent to POW camps in South Africa and abroad to camps at St. Helena, Ceylon, India and Bermuda. One of the favourite pastimes of the POWs were to make POW Art, especially toys.

Spinning wheel

After the Anglo-Boer / South African War the humanitarian, Emily Hobhouse, experienced the post-war poverty and misery first-hand. She established home industries such as spinning and weaving schools to help the young women and girls back onto their feet.

British chocolate tin

The Anglo-Boer War / South African War was fought on South African soil from 11 October 1899 – 31 May 1902. It was the last imperial war that Great Britain fought under Queen Victoria’s rule. Queen Victoria sent tins like this one, containing six small chocolate bars, to the soldiers in South Africa as a Christmas gift.

View ​in HOLO-MUSEUM Application

Heliograph

During the Anglo-Boer / South African War, communication was often wireless. The British Army as well as the Orange Free State Artillery and the Transvaal State Artillery used signal flags and heliographs to communicate. The word ‘heliograph’ is derived from the Greek ‘helios’ (sun) and ‘graphos’ (writing).

View in HOLO-MUSEUM Application

Model cart and horses

During the Anglo-Boer / South African War British forces captured thousands of Boer prisoners of war (POWs). As a temporary measure, four POW camps were erected in South Africa namely at Green Point (Cape Town), Bellevue (Simon’s Town), Tin Town (Ladysmith) and Umbilo (Durban).

View in HOLO-MUSEUM Application

Spinning wheel

During the Anglo-Boer / South African War the humanitarian, Emily Hobhouse, campaigned for improved conditions in the white and black concentration camps.  After her return to South Africa in 1903, she experienced the post-war poverty and misery first-hand.

View in HOLO-MUSEUM Application